Chapter Four: Magic and Hope

My friends and family in Las Delicias, El Salvador

My friends and family in Las Delicias, El Salvador

Through my semester long study abroad in El Salvador, my two trips to East Los Angeles to visit Fr. Greg Boyle and Homeboy Industries,  my four years volunteering at Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital, and my studies as a Psychology major, I learned about hope.  We all need it.  Based on my experiences, I believe that spiritual poverty (lack of hope) is far worse than any sort of monetary or material poverty.  Magic can change that.  Often, it is not about the facts of our reality, but rather, how we perceive and approach our reality.

he spring break trip leaders at Homeboy Industries Silkscreen

The spring break trip leaders at Homeboy Industries Silkscreen

Upon my graduation from Gonzaga, I received a Fulbright Grant to live, learn, and teach in Bogotá, Colombia.  As a part of my grant, I taught English at a university in Bogotá.  I was also required to work on an independent project of my choosing.

Colombia Map

Colombia

For my project, I partnered with Magicians Without Borders (MWB) and we developed a project that brought the organization to Colombia for the first time ever.  All over the globe, Magicians Without Borders provides hope for those who have little to be hopeful about. We use magic as a metaphor for hope that the seemingly impossible is possible. This is exactly what I learned and practiced during my time at the Children’s Hospital. The mission of MWB is to: entertain, educate, and empower the forgotten children of the world.

Magicians Without Borders video:

Article about Magicians Without Borders on the front page of the Burlington Free Press in Vermont:
  • Friends-Family-Las-Delicias-El-Salvador
  • Homeboy
  • Colombia