Feel Into It

hiking the pass

2 weeks trekking the Annapurna Circuit in the Himalayas of Nepal with my wonderful friends was exactly what my soul needed and craved.  The pure, unfiltered beauty and power of nature fills and humbles my spirit like nothing else.  Being in nature dematerializes my cluttered mind and rematerializes the complex sensuous experience of my surroundings.  Nature enables me to feel into each moment paying attention to the ebb and flow of my energy and how it relates to the universe as a whole.  By feeling into the moment we can become increasingly mindful of the inner world that is so easy to neglect.  Nature helps facilitate this presence within me – what ignites your presence?

                                                                                                                               

Only in Nepal can you hike to 18,000 feet in altitude, walk all day for days on end, and still have a hot meal and a bed each night.  Not a bad life.  I’ll let the pictures do the rest of the sharing.

 jeep departure

Loading the Jeep on Day 1

first steps

The First Steps

the crewThe Crew

meet joe

Meet Joe: Our master planner for the trek who has been traveling the world for the last 7 months.

meet gabe

Meet Gabe: My good friend whom I have known since early elementary school.

meet scott and wendy

Meet Scott and Wendy: They will be getting married in August and decided to quit their jobs and spend this whole year traveling.  They were just coming from spending 3 months in rural Thailand teaching English.

goofy porters

Meet our Porters: Tough, simple, and humorous.

meet trail

Meet the Trail

endless prayer wheelsEndless Prayer Wheels: Throughout the trek, there were long walls of prayer wheels to spin as you pass.

prayer wheelin

Prayer Wheelin’

mini showTea House Mini Magic Show

goofin

Goofin’: They say that with a beard comes great responsibility…

wild rock face

Rounded Rock Face

ManangHigh Mountain Town of Manang

high camp

High Camp: A bed and hot food at 16,200 feet

the crew 2

The Crew at High Camp

gabe wendy and i

High Camp Views

throng la summit

Throng La Pass: 17,769 feet, I was told it is the highest point you can hike to without venturing to the realm of mountaineering.  

throng la from belowThrong La Pass from 7,000 vertical feet and 27km below: On the trek, I was consistently blown away by the sheer magnitude of the mountains.  Those peaks on either side of the pass are well over 23,000 feet.

parting waysParting ways in the Mustang Valley: Joe and Gabe continued for a week to the Tibetan Mustang Valley while Wendy, Scott, and I began our journey to Pokhara and then back to Kathmandu.

mustang to tibet

Mustang Valley to Tibet

pokhara

Pokhara on a Cloudy Day

pokhara2

Pokhara on a Clear Day

Kathmandu Buddhist Stoupa

Buddhist Stoupa in Kathmandu

Satish Family

Satish’s Family: Our dear Gonzaga friend, Satish (not in the picture), is from Kathmandu, Nepal.  His family invited us to their home for a delicious lunch after trekking.

                                                                                                                                

My heart goes out to the Everest climbers who lost their lives in an avalanche.  As we began climbing to Throng La Pass at 4:30 am, we heard an avalanche boom down the peak across the valley below.  Too close to home.  Life is fragile and we must savor it.

This trip provided invaluable space to re-center myself before my final month in India and before I begin medical school in less than two months.  Now back in Mumbai, I am eagerly awaiting Magicians Without Borders Founder and President, Tom Verner, who will be arriving this week.

I will leave you with a quote that I have been reflecting on: “World conditions continue to challenge us to look beyond the status quo for responses to the pain of our times.  We look to powers within as well as powers without.  A new spirituality based social activism is beginning to assert itself.  It stems not from hating what is wrong and trying to fix it, but from loving what could be and making the commitment to bring it forth.” – Marianne Williamson

Feel into it, bit by bit, peel the layers back so that together, we can bring forth what it means to truly be alive.

the pose

6 thoughts on “Feel Into It

  1. Life will seem pretty quiet and laid back when you return home. What could match that association with nature that you have experienced? Keep those thoughts they will become even more valuable as time passes.

  2. Another marvelous adventure and with such good friends. Traveling the “roof of the world” with old friends; trekking through the great giants of the planet in all their majesty. Glorious. So looking forward to seeing you in a few days in Mumbai to continue the journey of bring love, laughter, magic and hope to forgotten children. Lots of love, Tom

  3. Oh My, the pictures say it all – glorious, indeed! So special to share this experience with a Burlington Buddy and friends from Gonzaga. (I recall having a powerful “ah-ha” while sitting in a boat solo on the Pokara Lake enraptured my “The Magestic Giant” before me, 30 years ago – it is still with me, nature IS transformative). So loved your closing quote – yes, a positive forward focus of delivering goodwill and joy is of upmost benefit to all beings. Carry on, Ryan. Xoxo

  4. Each blog seems like more WOW—–your life experiences have taken you to heights that will serve you and all you encounter for all the days to come! Thanks for sharing your magic and living life beyond limits!
    Love,
    Connie

  5. Thanks for sharing, Ryan! Looks like you guys had an incredible time!! Wouldn’t have expected anything less. Even the pictures are breathtaking… can’t imagine what it must have been like to trek it for two weeks, and with such great company! 🙂

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